To say that the world went for a wild ride in 2017 is to understate the obvious. On virtually every front — from politics and media to natural disasters, mass shootings and the solar eclipse — the United States has seen, heard and felt things that were without precedent.

One of the top stories of the year was the emergence of the #MeToo movement. From Milwaukee to New York and from Los Angeles to Chicago and every place in between, victims of sexual harassment spoke out and named names. Powerful people with wealth and fame fell one after another in 2017 after being outed for harassment, sexual assault and other forms of misconduct in the workplace.

Much of the #MeToo movement had its genesis in the bombshell reports dropped on movie producer Harvey Weinstein in the New York Times and New Yorker. The articles detailed the film mogul’s years of sexual harassment and assaults in offices, hotel rooms and backstage.

Once the Weinstein stories broke, allegations about other powerful people followed, including accusations leveled at U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, NBC’s Matt Lauer, Congressman Trent Franks, Garrison Keillor, comedian Louis CK, Senator Al Franken, former President George H.W. Bush and dozens of others.

The movement has emboldened women to publicly reveal the names of abusive men who have for years been protected by power, money, influence and tradition.

More remains to be done, of course. Much more. Victims of sexual harassment can stop the verbal abuse, the unwanted touching, the jokes, the groping and the workplace discrimination.

If you have suffered sexual harassment on the job, you can speak with an employment law attorney experienced in stopping the abuse and protecting clients from retaliation.