A short drive north of Milwaukee will land you in Germantown. The suburb is known for German food, its community garden and its farmers market. The town has made recent headlines after its fire chief quit under a cloud of allegations of “inappropriate” behavior.

Although the exact nature of the allegations have not been made public, the village administrator was quick to tell news outlets that Germantown plans “discrimination, harassment and retaliation policy revisions and training for all village employees.”

The administrator also said that the village’s employees must understand that the community “will not tolerate harassing, discriminatory or retaliatory behavior by any employee.”

Gary Weiss resigned as fire chief after an employee contacted village officials with allegations of misbehavior. The village administrator then met with the employee, who apparently revealed more allegations that had not been disclosed in the earlier complaint.

While no one but those directly involved in village management knows the nature of the complaints, we do know that in far too many cases employees are sexually harassed by a supervisor and then suffer retaliation when they complain about the harassment. Retaliation can take many forms, including:

  • Termination
  • Denied promotions
  • Denied raises
  • Unfavorable assignments
  • Hostile work environment
  • Demotion
  • Negative performance reviews

Federal and Wisconsin law prohibiting harassment and retaliation are complex. If you are not sure if conduct in your workplace violates your rights, contact an employment law attorney to discuss circumstances in your situation and your legal options.

Contact Fox & Fox, S.C.to schedule a free consultation.